Tag Archives: history

100 years of exploration in the Llanos de Moxos: Reflections on past, present and future of the archaeology of eastern Bolivia

Dr Eduardo Machicado-Murillo is currently working as a field archaeologist for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU), and a research associate of The Charles McBurney Laboratory for Geoarchaeology. He has been carrying out research in Bolivia since 2001. Eduardo received a Licenciatura from Universidad Mayor de San Andres (2009) and has a MPhil in Archaeological Research (2011) and a PhD from the University of Cambridge (2017).

Friday 27 October 2017, 18.30
Room G34, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
Tickets, including refreshments: non-members £6, members £5, students (with valid ID) £3
To book, email: anglobolivian@gmail.com

The history of Amazonia remains shrouded in mystery, as the largest natural reserve and final frontier for exploration in the continent. Within the basin, the Llanos de Moxos in eastern Bolivia has attracted a fair amount of scientific interest in recent decades. In this talk, Eduardo will tell us about the archaeology of the region and highlight the unexpected discoveries that are changing our modern perception of Pre-Columbian life in the tropical forest.

For almost a century, Amazonia was considered peripheral to the development of American civilisation. However, recent investigations show that it was home for dense and highly organised societies, contemporaneous with the expansion of the Tiwanaku Empire (800 – 1200 AD).

Scientific exploration in the Llanos de Moxos has an important effect on conservation policy and economic development of eastern Bolivia. This is particularly important, in the face of highly controversial development projects and claims to political autonomy.

Andrés de Santa Cruz reexamined 1792-1865

Dr. Natalia Sobrevilla
Reader in Hispanic Studies
University of Kent
Thursday, 24 September 2015 at 18:30
Joint presentation with the
Institute of Latin American Studies
Room G22/26 Senate House
Malet Street, WC1E 7HU
Tickets: £10 entry (£5 for students & concessions)
Glass of wine, refreshments included.
For booking email: anglobolivian@gmail.com

Andrés de Santa Cruz y Calahumana was born in the city of La Paz in the Viceroyalty of Río de la Plata in 1792 at the very end of the colonial period, when the Andes were still firmly under the control of the Spanish monarchy. He grew up in the aftermath of the greatest indigenous rebellion seen in 300 years and lived through the convulsed times that led to independence. Santa Cruz was an important participant during this time of change. He had the opportunity to lead and fought to shape the newly established republics in the Andes. He was president of Peru and Bolivia and between 1836 and 1839 he established a Confederation between these countries.
In this talk Dr. Sobrevilla will reflect upon life and the challenges Santa Cruz faced growing up as an empire broke down and the role he played in creating independent states. This presentation coincides with the 150th anniversary of the death of Andrés de Santa Cruz.

Katari and the Seacoast during the Bolivian Gas War

Sue Iamamoto

PhD Candidate, School of Politics and International Relations

Queen Mary University of London

Capes / Brazil

Thursday 19 March 18:30

Joint presentation with the

Institute of Latin American Studies

Torrington Room (104), First Floor

Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

Glass of wine, refreshments and nibbles included

                       Send email for booking at anglobolivian@gmail.com                       

Eleven years ago, in September / October 2003, a powerful social mobilisation paralysed Bolivia to demand nationalisation of natural gas. The setting for this struggle was mainly the highland provinces of the department of La Paz and the city of El Alto, overlooking the seat of the government of La Paz. After more than 50 protestors were killed by the army, President Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada resigned on 17 October 2003. This presentation will focus on the power of collective memories during these days, more specifically how the protestors incorporated narratives of two particular events: the anti-colonial rebellion of Tupac Katari in 1781 and the War of the Pacific in 1879-1880, in which Bolivia lost its seacoast. These collective memories were entangled with the protestors´ national and ethnic identities and were central to frame and make sense of new political projects for Bolivia’s future.