Category Archives: Events

“Revisitando la Historia de Bolivia”

Desde el periodo pre-colombino

hasta la Independencia (1825)

Mariana Swann – escritora y profesora de idiomas

www.marianaswann.com

Sábado 22 Octubre 15:00

Iglesia St John’s Waterloo, Crypt

Waterloo Road, London SE1 8TY

(frente a la estación de Waterloo)

Refrescos y bocadillos incluidos. Entrada gratuita. Cupos limitados. Estudiantes bienvenidos

Para reservar sitio enviar correo electrónico a:

anglobolivian@gmail.com         

La historia de un pueblo es fascinante, con una narrativa similar a un cuento o una novela. Diferente a lo que nos enseñaron en el colegio con fechas de batallas y nombres de héroes.

Una historia donde el rol protagónico del pueblo quedo silenciado.

Esta revisita de nuestra historia en el periodo anterior a la Independencia servirá para:

  • recordar y valorar nuestra cultura
  • comprender los motivos de nuestra situación
  • sentirnos orgullosos de lo que somos y podemos llegar a ser
  • servirá sobre todo para compartir y difundir lo que sabemos

“Bolivian Chevening Scholars Meet-up” & “Burguesia Chola” update by Dr. Kate Maclean

Friday 21 October 18:30

Joint presentation with the

Institute of Latin American Studies

Senate House, The Court Room, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

Tickets: Non-members £8, Members £6, Students (with valid ID) £5

Refreshments and nibbles included.

To book send email: anglobolivian@gmail.com

We welcome Bolivia’s 2016 Chevening Scholars to the UK and this event offers each of the eight the opportunity to give a short presentation about their background and planned research.

The meet-up will be followed by an update on A-BS’s council member and Leverhulme Fellow Dr. Kate Maclean’s research on the Burgesía Chola.  Kate spoke to us about her work in February and she has just returned from a research trip to La Paz.

A big part of the A-BS is the connection between individuals in Bolivia and the UK and we feel this event offers members a unique opportunity to engage with young Bolivian scholars at the start of their careers, while catching up with a UK academic with a proven research record.

I was born here: Community and Belonging in an Afro-Bolivian town

Chuck Sturtevant
MPhil in Ethnographic Documentary, University of Manchester
Anglo-Bolivian Society award winning thesis 2015
Tuesday 5 April 18:30
Joint presentation with the
Institute of Latin American Studies
Senate House, Bedford Room G37, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU
Tickets: Non-members £8, Members £6, Students (with valid ID) £5
Refreshments and nibbles included.
Send email for booking to: anglobolivian@gmail.com

Chuck Sturtevant carried out several months of fieldwork, producing both a written ethnography and an ethnographic film, in the town of Chicaloma, in the Yungas of La Paz. Chicaloma is widely known as an Afro-Bolivian community. Its Saya dancers and drummers are known throughout Bolivia, and its football team is recognised throughout the Yungas. But within the confines of the community, this identification is hotly contested. Those who claim descent from enslaved Africans emphasise their rootedness in the area and their connections to family and friends within the community; they trace their family histories through parents and uncles who lived nearby, recall their efforts to revive Afro-Bolivian dance and culture, narrate their role in building up the infrastructure of the community, and recount their exploits on the football pitch. Meanwhile, those residents of Chicaloma who do not claim descent from enslaved Africans have different ideas of belonging and what it means to be from Chicaloma.  In this presentation, which includes a documentary film, Chuck will talk about his experiences and focus in particular on ideas of belonging and identity in this Afro-Bolivian community – an area often absent from Bolivian political debate.

Bolivia Feb 2016 Referendum What do the results really mean?

Panel Discussion

Dr. John Crabtree

Research Associate, Latin American Centre, University of Oxford

Alberto Souviron

Bolivian digital media specialist / journalist with social media background

Thursday 25 February 18:30

Joint presentation with the

Institute of Latin American Studies

Senate House, Bloomsbury Room G35, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

Tickets: Non-members £8, Members £6, Students (with valid ID) £5

Reserve via email. Pay at the door.

Refreshments and nibbles included.

Send email for booking. Email: anglobolivian@gmail.com                    

Bolivian voters will again be going to the polls on 21 February 2016, in a third national election in two years. In October 2014 President Evo Morales and Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera were re-elected for a third term and sub-national elections for governors and mayors were held in March 2015. The Referendum to be staged on Sunday 21 February will consult the electorate on amending the 2009 Constitution to enable Morales and Garcia Linera, whose current term of office ends in January 2020, to stand for a fourth term until January 2025. A No vote would mean no change to the current constitution, barring Morales and Garcia Linera from standing for office in the 2019 general election, while a Yes would enable them to seek the fourth term. The panel including Dr. John Crabtree and Alberto Souviron will analyse the social, political and economic implications of these results and complex manoeuvring behind the scenes leading up to the Referendum.
ADDENDA: Traditional Press and Social Media Perspectives

In January this year, President Morales declared the political right had been reduced to communicating via traditional media and social networks. At the beginning of February, he complained about attacks he received in social media. In the meantime, various controversies and accusations have populated this space and later reflected in the traditional press. The campaign in favour and against the re-election of the President and Vice-President has been heated in all media.

In his panel presentation digital media specialist Alberto Souviron will explore whether social media is a fortress of the political right and the opposition? He will also examine if web 2.0 reflects the real debate in Bolivia, and analyse social media use by the No and Yes campaigns.

The Burguesia Chola and the changing cityscapes of El Alto and La Paz

Dr. Kate Maclean
Lecturer in Geography at Birkbeck, University of London
Thursday 11 February 2016 at 18:30
Joint presentation with
the Institute of Latin American Studies
Bedford Room (G37), Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU Tickets: Non-members £8, Members £6, Students (with valid ID) £5 Refreshments included.
For booking email:  anglobolivian@gmail.com

Explosions of colour and the uniquely vivid Andean symbology woven into the architecture herald the rise of the socalled ‘chola bourgeoisie’ – the ‘new rich’ of El Alto and the north of La Paz, who have made their money in commerce, often informally.  In addition to the spectacular architecture, El Alto also now boasts luxury hotels and some of the most expensive property in the country.  Mobility between the two cities is also changing, as the ‘new rich’ seek property in the more salubrious areas of La Paz, such as La Zona Sur.  The development of new urban transport networks – the cable car and Puma bus – have opened up new connections in the city that are changing culture and identity, and transforming social divisions that are centuries old.  In this talk, Kate Maclean reports back on the first stage of her Leverhulme project on the changing cityscapes of El Alto and La Paz.  She will look at particular examples of the dramatic changes to the urban and cultural landscape in the two cities, and discuss reasons for the rise of the ‘chola bourgeoisie’.