All posts by ukbolivia

Conservation through coexistence: Andean bears and people in Bolivia

Ximena is a conservation fellow at Chester Zoo UK, and research associate at WildCRU, University of Oxford. Based in Bolivia, Xime has been actively involved in the study of the ecology and  conservation of Andean bears. She has an M.S. in Geographic Information Systems from the  University of Leicester, UK, and a Ph.D from the University of Antwerp, Belgium

Thursday 25 May 2017, 18.30
Room G34, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Tickets, including refreshments: members and non-members £5, students (with valid ID) £3

Conserving large carnivores is a pressing issue worldwide.  The ecological and conservation roles of bears, as keystone and umbrella species, and even the cultural importance of this group addressed by the scientific community, is rarely reflected at the local level where communities suffer diverse costs from coexisting with bears. In Bolivia 45% of people live in poverty, and Inter-Andean dry forest (IADF) poverty reaches the 90%. This is a joint project of Chester Zoo and WildCRU to assess human-bear conflict in the Inter – Andean dry forest of Tarija, Bolivia, an ecosystem identified as a priority for Andean bear research and conservation, and to estimate bear’s population size.

 

Brazilian organized crime and drug gangs – an international problem with international consequences

Dr. Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho is Lecturer in Brazilian Studies at King’s College London  and Honorary Professor for Brazilian Studies at Aarhus University in Denmark.  He researches in Brazilian Defence and Security issues.

Tuesday 16 May 2017, 18.30
Room G35, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
Tickets, including refreshments: non-members £8, members £6, students (with valid ID) £5

To book, email: http://anglobolivian@gmail.com

Organized crime and drug gangs are increasing their activities in Brazil in recent years. Violent crimes related to territorial dispute by drug gangs are creating a feeling of war zone in many urban centers in Brazil, with very high homicide rates. This problem is, however, not restricted to Brazilian territory, but is affecting the region as a whole. This talk will present the current situation of organized crime in Brazil and discuss the international consequences of this issue, especially regarding Bolivia, Colombia and Paraguay.

How Bolivia curbed coca production by moving away from violent crackdowns

Dr Thomas Grisaffi is a social anthropologist currently working as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of the Americas (University College London). His main research focus is the political ascent of the Chapare coca growers’ union in Bolivia.

Thursday 6 April 2017, 18.30
Room G34, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
Tickets, including refreshments:
non-members £8, members £6, students (with valid ID) £5

Bolivia is the world’s third largest producer of cocaine, a drug manufactured from coca leaf – which is central to Andean culture. On coming to power in 2006 President Morales made a radical break with the previous US-backed anti-drugs strategy, which focused on the forced eradication of coca leaf and the criminalisation of coca growers. That approach resulted in two decades of violence, and neither reduced coca production nor restricted the flow of drugs reaching the US. Bolivia’s new policy, often referred to as ‘coca yes cocaine no’, draws on the coca growers’ own distinction between coca leaf and cocaine. The strategy legalized the cultivation of a small amount of coca leaf in specific zones, encourages the coca unions to self-police to ensure growers do not exceed this limit, and envisions the industrialization and export of coca-based products.

The overriding aim of the policy is to reduce harmsto coca grower communities. Drawing on extensive ethnographic fieldwork carried out in the Chapare coca-growing region Thomas Grisaffi provides a bottom up account of the new coca policy.

 

Decolonising witchcraft: Portraits of traditional healers in Bolivia

A collaboration between :
Photographer David X Green and Geographer Dr Kate Maclean

Photographs of chifleras and amautas. The indigenous wisdom in these women’s work involves the rituals, artifacts and medicines that play a central role in culture, health and spirituality in Bolivia although it has been been sidelined as “witchcraft” under colonial powers.

Exhibition 4-25 March 2017

Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck, University of London School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square London WC1H 0PD

For more infomation please visit:
www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research/peltz-gallery

3 March 2017: Panel discussion 4-6 pm Private view 6-8 pm www.davidxgreen.com 

For tickets:  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/decolonising-witchcraft-implications-for-knowledge-and-health-tickets-30921422808

Umaturka “The call of the water”

Screening of the Documentary By:
Giovanna Miralles & Dr. Peter Wilkin
Thursday, 8 December 2016 at 18:30

Joint presentation with the Institute of Latin American Studies Room 22 / 26, Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

Tickets: Non-members £8, Members £6, Students (with valid ID) £5 Glass of wine and refreshments included.

For booking email:  anglobolivian@gmail.com

In the Bolivian Andes members of the Aymara community of Quillacas perform an annual ritual to summon rain clouds at the end of the dry season that reflects the ecological co-dependency of the Andes and the Amazonian region. In Umaturka artist, writer and filmmaker Giovanna Miralles and environmental anthropologist Peter Wilkin allow the protagonists in the events to relate a sometimes fraught and contentious narrative. The result is an unsentimental portrait of the reality of an ancient tradition in a modern world. In November 2015 Giovanna and Peter presented the film’s trailer to Anglo-Bolivian Society members and friends who can now enjoy the completed documentary. There will be a stall offering merchandise, the proceeds from which will go towards funding the modification of the museum in Quillacas so the film can be permanently available to the community.